How to Take Over Your Local Democratic Party Step by Step

By MrBrainStorm.

Do you want to change which people get elected to the Democratic National Committee (DNC)?

Read this for all of your answers!

Just kidding. Here’s the short version of how the DNC delegates are elected:

  • The State Executive Committee (SEC) drafts a Delegate Selection Plan that is used to pick delegates to the DNC. The only stipulation for this in the state party’s Plan Of Organization is that an even number of men and women are elected as Delegates (section 7.02).
  • SEC members are elected by the Executive Committees from each county.
  • The County Executive Committees are made up of a few elected officers and the elected precinct Chairs.
  • This means the more precincts that are chaired by progressives, the more voting power progressives have to change the party platform, put more progressives in leadership positions at the DNC and state level, and get corporate money out of the DNC.

TL;DR: Changing the Democratic Party starts at the precinct level!

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Sanders Activists Energize Struggles in the South

By Mike Elk, senior labor reporter at Payday Report and member of the Washington-Baltimore NewsGuild. This article is reposted from Talking Union with the permission of the blog’s owner.

CHATTANOOGA, TENNESSEE – Khristy Wilkinson, a 34-year-old, tattoo-adorned, stay-at-home mom, doesn’t look like your typical Eastern Tennessee politician. Before this year, she had never even considered running for public office, but says that she was inspired to run by the success of Bernie Sanders.

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Until recently, Wilkinson was an adjunct philosophy professor teaching at the University of Tennessee at Chattanooga. She has been active in her community, Highland Park, for years, and has been disturbed by the changes gentrification has brought to her neighborhood.

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Meet the Democratic Socialist Running for NY’s State Senate

By Sam Adler-Bell. Originally published by The Nation.

Debbie Medina has lived her entire life south of Grand Street in the Southside of Williamsburg, a historically Puerto Rican neighborhood in Brooklyn. The office of Southside United HFDC — better known as Los Sures — where Medina has worked as a housing organizer for 30 years, is on South Fifth, eight blocks away. When she walks down Driggs Avenue, Debbie can point at the buildings and recite their histories. “This neighborhood has always had some nasty landlords,” she says.

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Debbie Medina (center) with the city council’s Antonio Reynoso (D) (right).

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